Luboš Fišer ‎– Morgiana 10″

Galvanising our ongoing commitment to the lost music of the Czech New Wave cinema movement from the late 1960s and 1970s, Finders Keepers Records follow up our series of previously unreleased music to Valerie And Her Week Of Wonders, Daisies, Saxana and The Little Mermaid with a short series of soundtracks for films by the country’s master of the macabre and the nation’s first point of call for freakish fairytales and hallucinogenic horror, Mr. Juraj Herz.

Regarded as the final ever film of the Czech New Wave, Juraj Herz’s Morgiana (alongside Valerie And Her Week Of Wonders) was made after the Prague Spring during Czech cinema’s most scrutinised censorship era, deep in the throws of communism. Spearheading a micro-cosmic sub-genre of horror fantasy or scary/fairytales alongside Karel Kachyňa’s Malá Mořská Víla (The Little Mermaid), these directors built a handful of subversive, flamboyant and experimental new films based around classical communist approved surrealist literature; sidestepping creative compromise and uniting some of the leading lights of the FAMU founded film movement for the last time. Both musical scores courtesy of Luboš Fišer unite Valerie and Morgiana; sharing doppelgänger production and compositional ideas presented by Finders Keepers Records for the first time ever outside of the original context of the film.

It is easy to hear why the music for both films could easily be confused as part of the same score, or as very close twin sisters, having been recorded just 18 months apart in 1970 and 1972. Revealing tiny shards of identical melodic phrasing, the Morgiana score visits darker hallucinogenic corners for this tale of two sisters seen through the perspective of giallo-esque “cat’s eye” camera work (filmed by Jaroslav Kučera) revealing poison induced hysteria fuelled by sibling rivalry and desperately twisted jealousy. Adopting his mysteriously macabre musical persona, the versatile Fišer interweaves chimes, harps and harpsichord with echoing flutes, lutes and piano, applying his signature orchestral tension and experimental percussion traits in the form of treated pianos, vibra-slaps, tape samples of striking matches and spring reverbs to this oblique heady selection.

Revered in similar esteem to that of Czech film legend Zdeněk Liška, Fišer’s unreleased filmography of forward-thinking Czech scores is slowly reaching a wider global audience through his first ever dedicated commercial soundtrack releases which should, in time, win him the same votes of confidence that we now award the likes of Komeda, Korzyński, Roubaix and Nicolai, amongst other European soundtrack luminaries.

Old Price: $22.00

Price: $12.00

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Bruno Nicolai ‎– Your Vice Is A Locked Room & Only I Have The Key 7″

Finding the perfect axis between the likes of Goblin, Roubaix, Barry and Sorgini this bloodthirsty entrée to our Bruno Nicolai and Edwige Fenech series delivers a vinyl debut for the music of this lesser-known beat driven Sergio Martino Giallo horror. A real treat for the patient Euro VHS fans and the library collector alike this varied vinyl compact OST finally spreads its wings.

As the third instalment of a devoted series of vinyl releases focussing on Italian composer Bruno Nicolai’s soundtrack music to the films of Edwige Fenech, Finders Keepers serve this bloody hors d’oeuvres of 4 tracks from the 1971 Sergio Martino Poe inspired Italian thriller Your Vice Is A Locked Door And Only I Have The Key.

This limited pressed 7″ EP opens up with one of the composer’s greatest Giallo theme tunes from his recorded golden era containing all of those characteristic traits as previously heard on our De Sade and Conte Dracula releases. Previously only available in edited form as the lead track of the much sought-after but commercially unavailable Rendez Vous library LP, Finders Keepers have paired our loyalty to both the Euro horror video collectors as well as the vinyl detectives to bring you something unique and truly coveted from italian shock cinema’s vibrant plumage.

Bass driven, beat laden with deranged psychedelic symphonies (finding the perfect axis between the likes of Goblin, Roubaix and Barry) this four track instalment also combines other melodic pastoral harpsichord and clavinet motifs echoing Nicolai’s work with Morricone for films like Lizard In A Woman’s Skin to make this compact forerunner the perfect rounded release for a long overdue vinyl debut.

Price: $10.00

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Martin Hannett & Steve Hopkins – All Sorts of Heaven 7″

From the shrapnel of the unlikely collision point where Mancunian post-punk royalty collides with sci- cinema and art house animation, this obscure diamond in the rough shines a new light on the Northern DIY era providing disc detectives with a whole new punk funk perspective. Recorded in 1976 by Invisible Girls’ Steve Hopkins and Martin Hannett for a truly bizarre stop-motion animation called All Sorts OF Heroes, this hard edged funk instrumental theme reveals another side to this versatile production team joining the hidden dots between Hannett’s own discoid experiments with ESG, Gyro, A Certain Ratio and the mythical Afro Express recordings from the same year.

Embodying as much in common with 1970’s bass heavy European funk soundtracks by bands like Goblin and Placebo, as the expected parallels with John-Cooper Clarke’s backing tracks or early Happy Mondays, this early 1976 session is the perfect example of Hannett and Hopkins’ under-the-radar artistic commissions working to a storyboard brief in what has now become recognised as a fertile arena for lost lmic funk.

Drawing historic parallels with Leeds-based Graeme Miller and Steve Shill’s home recorded DIY soundtracks for The Moomins animation and accentuating the connection between Manchester based animation house Cosgrove Hall (Dangermouse/Chorlton And The Wheelies) and its employees Bernard Sumner, John Squire and members of Gerry And The Holograms, this lost recording adds kudos to a quirky micro-niche and reveals another dimension to Northern anti- pop’s snarky personality.

Pressed here by Finders Keepers for the first time on vinyl, in close accordance with the wishes of Steve Hopkins himself, this custom-composed track originally appeared on the short lm by Rick Megginson and Steve Hughes which was shown at the Ottawa International Animation Festival in 1976 where it might have otherwise remained, preserved in an 8mm lm box up until now. As relevant today as it was then, this closely recorded, cosmic cartoon, slappy funk theme provided the films backdrop for a workshop montage scene where an aardvarkian spaceman constructs a giant metal face robot which might well leave fans of Madlib and MF Doom fans pondering time travel?! Like much of the lost and unreleased projects that stalled on the peripheries of early proto-Madchester, including the disco-pogo music of Spider King, Gerry And The Holograms, The 48 Chairs, Naf and The Mothmen, this record has been frozen in time waiting for the wider marathon of independent pop to catch up!

Presented here faithful the 45 format of choice, this 7” might well be another missing link between your Rabid, Absurd and Factory records, backed with another lesser- known Invisible girls recording Scandinavian Wastes which has also been begging for its first vinyl outing since its recording in the early 1980’s. Another historical bucket list release for Finders Keepers Records outernational discography, leaving zero stones unturned, even the ones under our own doorstep

Price: $16.00

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Nahid Akhtar ‎– I Am Black Beauty LP

Compilation LP of pakistani “Lollywood” soundtracks. From films:
A1 – Zanjeer
A2 – Adawat
A3 – Uf Yeh Beevian
A4 – Akbar Amar Anthony
A5 – Aj Da Badmash
B1 – Naukar
B2 – Ankhon Ankhon Men
B3 – Kora Kaghaz
B4 – Zindagi Ya Maut
B5 – Surat Aur Seerat

Price: $30.00

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Don Cherry – Music, Wisdom, Love 1969 LP

Reaching a near-mythical status amongst fans of free jazz’s most worldly intrepid explorer, these seldom heard Paris soundtrack sessions known as Music, Wisdom, Love have evaded collectors’ grasps and confused historians for exactly 50 years. Instigated in Paris in 1967 and filmed during Don Cherry‘s downtime on a visit to the Chat qui Pêche nightclub in March 1967, where he played with Karl Berger, Henri Texier, and Jacques Thollot, the bulk of this cinematic portrait was filmed on the streets of Paris under the direction of creative all-rounders Jean-Noël Delamarre and Nathalie Perrey, who, as their careers bloomed, would become pivotal figures in underground French cinema – straddling La Nouvelle Vague, adult entertainment, and cinema fantastique in what can only be described as speedball cinema. As the supportive creative family that primarily played home to French vampire/horrortica director Jean Rollin, both Nathalie and Jean-Noël, his brother Jean-Philippe Delamarre and a small team of other fans of oblique media would be responsible for a vibrant micro-culture that awkwardly flourished on the outskirts on the Parisian new wave – combining comic book culture, Lettrism, sexual liberation, psychedelic rock, graphic design, and, with this record as prime example, free jazz and avant-garde music. What previously might have been regarded as an unlikely coupling, with the benefit of half a century of archival hindsight, this release documents the essential cosmic collision of two fantastic planets. Available here for the first time ever and licensed from producer and director Jean-Noël Delamarre himself.

Price: $28.00

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Steve Shill & Graeme Miller – The Moomins OST LP

Imagine, if you will, a foreboding homemade electro-acoustic, new age, synth-driven, proto-techno, imaginary world music created on a Portastudio soundtrack for a Polish-made animated fantasy based on a Finnish modern folk tale and created for German and Austrian TV, composed in 1982 by two politically-driven post-punk theater performers from a shared house in Leeds. To even the most perspicacious and adventurous of alternative music fans, the genuine bloodline of this previously unreleased record already begins to sound like an entire record collection in one sitting. It would be surprising if this project’s ambitious and exotic credentials didn’t tick at least one box on your musical matrix and without one drop of unnecessary nostalgic hyperbole this project already sounds like the perfect fantasy record that you’ve never heard. From the same social landscape as Gang Of Four, The Mekons, and Impact Theatre Co-operative – armed with a Wasp synthesizer, an ocarina, and a cassette of the Robinson Crusoe music taped off the TV, Graeme Miller and Steve Shill used minimum means for maximum mayhem, instilling over 35 years of dream-like illusory fuzziness and freakiness into the memories of a generation of school age TV addicts waiting for the next five minute fix of outer national fuzzy felt folklore. Collected here, all in one place for the first time, Finders Keepers, in close collaboration with the original composers, present the first-ever full soundtrack release for the UK-specific cult animated series. Finders Keepers take the original homemade micro-melodies and reintroduce them to a musical landscape where fans of vintage electronics, concrète tape effects, pocket percussion, and domestic synths are finally ready to be reunited with the magnetic music of Moominvalley.

Price: $30.00

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Jean-Bernard Raiteux – Les Demons LP

The unreleased Euro pysch score to the French/Portuguese X-rated version of The Devils meets The Witchfinder General! Synchronised by Spanish anti-establishmentarian, sexual liberator, die-hard independent filmmaker and unrepentant voyeur Jess Franco (Vampyros Lesbos/De Sade). Composed entirely by French composer Jean-Bernard Raiteux aka Jean-Michel Lorgere (Sinner/Harlem Pop Trotters) and presented here in full soundtrack form for the first time.

Proudly claiming the dubious accolade of the Spanish sexploitation version of The Devils as the distributor’s most bankable asset, this previously banned 1973 European witch flick would rip the art house facade from Ken Russell’s well polished box office smash and push the envelope way beyond the closet titillation of the gentrified new wave controversy seekers. Delivered on a comparable shoestring budget as the 55th feature in Jess Franco’s filmography of approximately 203 completed movies, The Demons (Les Démons), directed under the Anglicised pseudonym Clifford Brown, took many of the Franco’s sexually stylistic watermarks (epitomised in his Vampyros Lesbos trilogy) adding witchcraft, possession and nunsploitation against a rural Mediterranean backdrop before disappearing into the woods. Whilst clearly taking inspirational plot cues from Michael Reeve’s The Witchfinder General (UK 1968) and drawing comparisons with scenes from Eiichi Yamamoto’s Belladonna Of Sadness (Japan 1973) this B-Movie reduction of Franco’s wide palette of colourful ingredients has in recent years provided enthusiasts/champions/defenders of the workaholic horrotica bastion with a rare and treasured addition. Future-proofed by an essential component, omnipresent in Franco’s films, it is the mysterious commercially unobtainable soundtrack music that cements the unwaning interest in his risqué brand of unconventional shock/schlock sinema (not hindered my the enigmatic title card misinformation that often surrounds the original composers) and the music herein that has given Franco’s harshest critics a second chance/reason to reevaluate this man’s unapologetic art.

Following on from Finders Keepers previous expanded release of Bruno Nicolai’s score for Franco’s 1970 adaptation of De Sade (FKR069) this record stands as another tribute to Franco’s life which he lived through the mechanisms of a camera with relentless zeal and a passion to challenge every aspect of movie making along the way. UNDERground, OVERambitious, RIGHT on, LEFTfield, BELOW the radar but ABOVE criticism. INdulgent and OUTrageous, but never middle of the road, Jess Franco was many things but he wasn’t pretentious and never delivered art for art’s sake and I feel honoured to have spent time with him. Franco was in fact a realist, he kept both feet firmly on the ground and a keen eye behind the right side of the lens and if Jess did have any demons his films were his exorcisms, the critics were the bloody judges and his legacy (through the medium of X-rated cinema of variable quality) is immortal.

Price: $28.00

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Alan Parker – One Summer 7″

‘A theme so melodiously melancholy it’s been singing in my mind continually after one TV viewing 30 years ago’
Gruff Rhys

From the one-man studio vault of the guitarist who adorned Histoire De Melody Nelson, The Kick Inside AND Diamond Dogs comes a post-punk, 80’s TV soundtrack that aims to restore the unforgettable names of Billy and Icky in your nostalgic consciousness while liberating lost music of a significant unsung UK composer.

Bringing back fractured memories of Scouse teenage rebellion, sports casual weekend wear, chip shop violence and escape missions to the Welsh Valleys (where baby birds are fed Mars Bars and shoplifting is the local currency), the series One Summer made an indelible impression of gritty realism, tragic heartbreak and woeful hope in the hearts of a dumbstruck generation in 1983.

Inducing abject fear in protective parents and a street smart swagger amongst clued-up youths, this adaptation of a coming of age pastoral thriller by a reluctant Willy Russell broke new boundaries pinpointing a cultural teenage void between post punk activism and the acid house years while arguably giving Thatcherite telly addicts a tiny kick up the arse.

Scored by legendary KPM/De Wolfe library musician Alan Parker, a renowned session player for Serge Gainsbourg, Kate Bush and Bowie (amongst many more) this score retains a genre defying personality, pinpointing the stylistic essence of the era while successfully switching from barren Rumble Fish funk, pastoral Moog noodlings, Pentangular folk, 80’s post-punk rhythms with hints of dubby melodica/harmonica. Composed to cue for the short five-part series (that TV commissioners were too scared to revisit), Parkers bursts of self-propelled small screen scoring came in one to two minute spells allowing Finders Keepers to comfortably fit the entire soundtrack on one neat eleven track limited 7” EP thirty-three years down the train line.

Price: $13.00

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Suzanne Ciani – Buchla Concerts 1975 LP

The lost synth manifesto that could have changed the course of electronic music history by the first lady of modular synth history, Suzanne CianiBuchla Concerts 1975 is an archival project that not only redefines musical history but boasts genuine claim to such overused buzzwords as pioneering, maverick, experimental, groundbreaking, and esoteric, while questioning social politics and the evolution of music technology as we’ve come to understand it. To describe this record as a game-changer is an understatement. This record represents a musical revolution, a scientific benchmark, and a trophy in the cabinet of counterculture creativity. This record is a triumphant yardstick in the synthesizer space race and the untold story of the first woman on the proverbial moon. While pondering the early accolades of this record it’s daunting to learn that this record was in fact not a record at all . . . it was a manifesto and a gateway to a new world that somehow never quite opened. In 1975, Suzanne Ciani was a 29-year-old employee of the Buchla modular synthesizer company, San Francisco’s neck-and-neck contender with New York’s Moog. If the unfamiliar, modernistic, melodic pulses, tones, and harmonics found on this 1975 live presentation/grant application/educational demonstration had been placed in a phonographic context, they would have provided nothing short of an entirely different, feminine take on the experimental records of Morton Subotnick and proved to a small, judgmental audience and jury the true versatility of one of the most radical and idiosyncratic musical instruments of the 20th century. In denouncing her own precocious, polymathematic past in a bid to persuade the world to sing from a new hymn sheet, Suzanne Ciani created a byproduct of never-before-heard music that would render the pigeonholes “ambient” and “futuristic” utterly inadequate. These recordings have not been heard since then. Needless to say, this record, finally commanding the archival format of choice, was not the last “first” that this hugely important composer would gift to society and the future, in a wide range of exciting, evolving creative disciplines in the worlds of synth design, advertising, and film composition. You have found a holy grail of electronic music and a female musical pioneer who was too proactive to take the trophies. You can’t write history when you are too busy making it. With fresh ink in the bottomless well, let’s start at the beginning. Again. You are invited.

Price: $30.00

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Jean Claude Vannier – L’enfant Assassin Des Mouches Alternative Takes 7″

RECORD STORE DAY 2016

Late in 2015, exactly ten years since Finders Keepers Records first liberated Jean Claude Vannier’s 1973 French Holy Grail concept LP L’Enfant Assassin Des Mouches, the label was handed a very unexpected anniversary gift in the form of a small clutch of lost Vannier studio master tapes.  Having worked closely with Jean Claude to leave no stone unturned both label and artist were shocked and delighted to be given what turned out to be further insights in to the musical ideas and ambitions of the 29-year-old composer during those mythical studio sessions which occurred a few months after the release of his seminal work on Histoire De Melody Nelson.

The original L’Enfant Assassin Des Mouches LP has been the source of inspiration and awe for artists of all disciplines, critics and connoisseurs alike while retaining a firm fixture in many a tome and top ten, accounting for indispensable moments in avant-garde pop and experimental rock music and (with FKs repressing schedule as testimony) continues to gain momentum. The fact that these masters were dubbed to a separate master tape as a proposed aborted major label single indicates that they were the first (and most exciting) tracks to emerge from the flamboyant visionary sessions which eventually trickled out on small independent French label stimulating record collector nirvana in the process.

Including new unheard instrumentation, alternative arrangements and mix board levels, this special limited release comes packaged in authentic 1970’s promo bag artwork and marks the first in a series of new vintage Vannier projects extracted from a new vault of genuinely, previously “lost” materials.

 

Price: $14.00

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Don Cherry & Jon Appleton – Don & Jon 7″

Rare outtakes from early pioneering and controversial electronic jazz experiments presented on vinyl for the first time.  This previously unpressed music provides and absolutely essential insight into Zen master experimental jazz outsider Don Cherry on the eve of his fertile Holy Mountain period which saw the composer combine all his well-travelled influences – such as the free music incubation of France and Germany with the traditional instrumentation of India, north and west Africa – then return to New York with a technicolor dream team and a healthy appetite for emerging synthesisers and electronic music. This project between electro-acoustic pioneer and Synclavier developer Jon Appleton coincided with his own history defining years at Dartmouth College where he played an integral part in the formation of one of Americas first electronic music institutions.  Recording benchmark LPs for Folkways Records and Flying Dutchman Jon collaborated with Cherry to create the album Human Music which tested the boundaries of electronic sound, jazz and ethnological disciplines in a series of melodic and rhythmical interfaces that would polarise both musical tastes, pop politics and potential spiritual beliefs in the process.

Recorded in the exact same sessions at Bregman Electronic Music Studio, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire the two tracks Don and Jon did not appear on the Human Music LP and now show a glimpse of what future unisons might have bequeathed before both artists coincidentally re-located to Sweden to pursue their individual and very specific journeys into contemporary music. Released with the blessing and encouragement of Appleton himself this record is quite simply a treasure of a dream-combination from the early doors of genuine alternative popular music. These rare sides combine the creative technology that directly coincided with the dawn of Bob Moog’s and Don Buchla’s synthesiser revolution with the homecoming of outernational free jazz which, in tandem, spearheaded America’s most radical music developments in the subsequent two decades and beyond. Don/Jon and The Human Music sessions also prelude Cherry’s further imminent electronic positioning alongside Carla Bley and Don Preston (on Escalator Over The Hill) and in film soundtracks for Jean Rollin collaborator Jean-Noël Delamare and Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain (with Walter Sear) before a hiatus from the for almost a decade. This extra glimpse of that important era, at the hands of these two pioneers, is now available in this very special package.

Price: $10.00

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Masahiko Sato – Belladonna OST LP

“There was a time when the strength of a musician’s vision transcended all labels; here is a chance to dip into that pool again, and emerge not just refreshed, but alive again with the sense that we all can live in that world again, but most importantly raise the flag for excellence. Fantastic.”

Jim O’Rourke

An unholy grail of near mythical status finally joins the Finders Keepers Records discography in the form of this first-ever reissue of Masahiko Sato’s elusive sensual psychedelic free jazz score to the stunning Japanese witchcraft animation Belladonna Of Sadness (Kanashimi no Belladonna) directed by anime screenwriter Eiichi Yamamoto in 1973. An early feature-length example of a micro-genre in which Japanese anime producers collaborated with the “pink” film genre, Belladonna’s challenging occult, sexual and political subject matter was the cause of the film’s notoriety for many years, earning Yamamoto’s work a critical platform amongst some of the best counterculture animation films of the era such as La Planète Sauvage ( René Laloux/Roland T poor, France 1973), Marie Mathématique (Jean-Claude Forest, France 1967), Wizards (Ralph Bakshi, US 1977), Heavy Metal (Gerald Potterton, Canada 1980) and Time Masters (René Laloux/Moebius, France 1982). Drawing further stylistic similarities with Shuji Terayama/Tenjo Sajiki associated poster artist Aquirax Uno and the Hara-Kiri magazine cartoon strips Pravda/Jodelle by French artist Guy Peellaert, as well as the early flamboyant Klimtesque imagery of Jean Rollin collaborators Philippe Druillet and Nicolas Devil, Belladonna Of Sadness brought a strong European flavour to its sophisticated and stylish Japanese application which accentuated the French origins of the plot loosely based on accounts taken from the 1862 book La Sorcière (The Witch) by French historian Jules Michelet.

Over the last decade Belladonna Of Sadness has risen from the ashes and now shines brighter than ever. Now on the eve of its third or fourth global DVD release, fans no longer have to wait four months for third generation VHS telecine rubs from “that guy” in the States, or stuff their ambitious wish lists into the hands of any lucky friends visiting Tokyo in the summer. Belladonna has been used as nightclub projections by clued-up VJs and been restored by discerning feminist folk singers and improv bands while influencing illustrators, fashion designers and other creative types along the way.

Original copies of the soundtrack, however, are much less likely to rear their heads on a weekly basis, with prices literally doubling each time the original stock copies swap hands amongst the same Italian dealers at central European record fairs. Italian soundtracks are expensive anyway, but this one, as I’m sure you’ll agree, has got extra credentials. Finders Keepers Records, in direct collaboration with Sato himself, agree that this record should finally be liberated amongst those who know the magic words. With our decision to keep this album “strictly Sato” we removed a track – the main orchestral love theme by Asei Kobayashi and Mayumi Tachibana, which in all honesty is very much detached from Sato’s psychedelic soundtrack. Kept intact, however, are the songs sung and penned by Sato’s then wife Chinatsu Nakayama, including the track entitled TBFS (answers on a postcard?) that only appears on the master tapes and never actually made it to the theatrical cut of the film (although the theme is briefly alluded to, in different instrumentation, in a cut-scene available on the German DVD). This reissue project also marks the beginning of a longer intended relationship between Finders Keepers and Masahiko Sato, exploring his recorded work in both film music, jazz and avant garde composition.

 

Price: $30.00

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Jane Weaver / Tender Prey – Mission Desire 7″

Jane Weaver and Tender Prey take you on a double date and clear off before the bill comes. Cosmic funk radio wave fave Mission Desire shares black wax sides with Tender Preys trademark pow-wow pop punk for this reversible Bird variety performance.

Price: $12.00

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Ami Shavit – In Alpha Mood LP

The music of this record was stimulated by the theory and practice of biofeedback. It is aimed to create a calm, relaxed and meditative mood associated with alpha brain waves.’

Part outsider electronic album; part physiological experiment; part work of art; this is not your average new age record. You won’t find any cosmic or spiritual connotations between the unsupposing and briefly annotated gatefold covers. This is an accidental new age record. It wasn’t designed to evoke images of far away landscapes or induce meditative states; rather it is the end result of a personally developed meditative technique called Alpha Mood. The brainchild of a reclusive Israeli multimedia artist with a fascination in philosophy, technology and sound by the name of Ami Shavit, In Alpha Mood is the result of a personal and artistic exploration to both overcome a personal trauma and push the boundaries of a fledgling physiological understanding whilst utilising the burgeoning domestic synthesizer technology of the late 60s and early 70s.

With an enviable private collection of synthesisrs first started in 1972 during his travels to the US just as they first arrived in music stores and shipped home to Tel Aviv, the professor of both philosophy and art and established kinetic artist was fascinated with art that involved technology. In particular being able to give something mechanical an emotive angle. His early works primarily involved motorised mobiles (he actually installed one in Tel Aviv’s first discoteuque). Seeking to combine his love of electronic music acts like Tangerine Dream and Philip Glass and this new synthesiser technology with his fascination for the relatively new technique of biofeedback – a process in which technology is used to relay information about the body’s functions enabling a change in physiological activity in order to manipulate them. Combined with his understanding of alpha brainwaves (primarily attributed to a function of the brain that deals with relaxation), Ami embarked on an experiment with what he coined Alpha Mood – a state in which the brain is working in relaxation and in which he used music as a means of helping induce his own meditative state. With practically no formal musical training and working in complete isolation of the Tel Aviv music scene – with the exception of allowing cult prog nearly men Zingale and a handful of close friends to use his private studio – over the next two years he recorded hours and hours of experimental improvised music, or “sounds” as he prefers to call it.
Conscripted into the army evacuating battlefield casualties during the Yom Kippur War following the surprise invasion of the Israeli-occupied territories on the West Bank in 1973, Ami struggled to come to terms with his experiences during the short conflict and lost interest in his work until he came across a collection of field recordings made during the war and he had an epiphany. By adding sounds and battlefield sound bites to the recordings he could articulate his experiences in a sort of cathartic process and was able to put them behind him.
Harnessing this newfound confidence he continued in his work until a longtime friend, agent and owner of a small local record shop called Mango (a Tel Aviv institution at the time) suggested he press some of his recordings on vinyl so that he could sell them through his store. Rather than cull disparate excepts from his expansive tape archive of home recordings, Ami begin work on what would become the culmination of his years of experimentation and the centerpiece of his work with Alpha Mood.
Recorded in Ami’s studio during a handful of sessions and with no post-production, the six-track album was mastered at Triton Studios (who’s previous list of clients included Arik Einstein and Tamouz) and pressed by Hed Arzi (one of Israel’s oldest and largest labels/pressing plants) on his own Amis Records imprint with finished copies delivered to Mango three months later. Only 500 copies of a planned limited edition run of 5000 were initially pressed and with no publicity surrounding the release it was sold to discerning record buyers with little or no understanding of the record or its maker outside of his status as a prominent visual artist. Not long after receiving delivery of these first copies Mango was forced to close its doors permanently and the remaining 4500 copies of the run were never pressed. Apart from a handful of Alpha Mood exhibitions in Israel those 500 copies and six remaining master tapes (including that of In Alpha Mood – the rest having been lost, given to friends or simply thrown away) are the only remaining artefacts of Ami’s Alpha Mood experiments.

Price: $24.00

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Lamartine – Reportage LP

A genuine lost and unreleased full-length LP from one of the most mysterious figures of early Italian electronic sound and library music. A missing puzzle piece in the small discography of experimental tape and synthesiser music by the composer known only as Lamartine recorded (but never pressed) in 1974 by the archive that bought you the work of Daniela Casa and the wildest electronic experiments of Alessandroni, Giuliano Sorgini and Fabio Frizzi. Having sat in the can for over 40 years the similarities to the likes of Cluster, Tom Dissevelt and the Radiophonic workshop have yet to be recognised and celebrated.

Price: $24.00

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